Andy Griffiths Writing Challenge #3

Andy Griffiths, the author of Just Crazy, Just Tricking, Zombie Bums from Uranus and The 13-storey Treehouse, has just released his book about writing, called Once Upon a Slime.  In this very cool book he gives lots of tips about writing and some activities to help you become a better writer.  You’re probably looking for something to do in the holidays so why not try an Andy Griffiths writing challenge.

In the box below there is a writing challenge from Andy’s book, Once Upon a Slime.  Why not try it out and post your writing here on the blog.  Just post your piece of writing as a comment at the end of this post, along with your name and email address.  At the end of the week we’ll choose our favourite piece of writing and the author will win a prize pack of goodies from Typo.

Write a TO DO list

Make a list of all the things you HAVE to do in a typical week.  Now make a list of all the things you would LOVE to do instead.  Combine both lists to create your ultimate TO DO list.

For more great writing ideas check out Andy Griffiths’ new book, Once Upon a Slime.

5 Responses so far

  1. 1

    Ella said,

    Hello! My name is Ella. Beware, I have a very active imagination. You have been warned…

    OF ANGRY DISHWASHERS, ENGLISH ADVERBS,
    AND A KNIGHT IN RUSTY ARMOUR

    I wake up, leap out of bed and run downstairs. I get myself some breakfast and start to shovel it down as fast as I can, all the while keeping a weary eye out for our dog, Louie, who watches me eat my breakfast while prowling up and down beside the fridge, watching me all the while with an evil glint in his eye. I shovel down my breakfast faster, sweat starting to trickle down my brow, as he he glares at me with his big brown eyes. (Yes, dogs can glare!)
    Just as I finish scraping the dregs from my bowl, he storms away from the fridge and starts heading my way, looking VERY angry. I push back my chair with a screech and jump away from the table shaking like a leaf all the while. I smile a nervous tooothy grin at him, and show him my empty plate, my arm shaking slightly.
    “Look, Louie,” I say, “I’ve finished my breakfast, do you want your breky now?”
    Louie looks at me with suspicious eyes but when he hears the word breky, his muscles in his back relax, and he runs of towards the fridge.
    I breath a sigh of relief, he was about to spring. I missed death by a breath.
    I rush to the fridge and open it bring out Louie’s breky and let him eat it. I wait nervously shuffling my feet and then realizing I’m in the open, go behind the table and rest a hand lightly on a chair. If he lunges now at least I have a weapon to protect myself with. When he’s finished he comes over and licks my hand as a thank you. I stiffen, fearing he’s going to gnaw my hand of, but all all is well. I breath out, the beast is tamed. For the moment at least.
    Next is the dishwasher. I put on my armour, then clang and clump cautiously towards the monster (by the way, it is impossible to walk up quietly to a vicious dishwasher in rusty armour).
    I poke it with my sword, and when it doesn’t make a sound, I walk a little closer. Nothing. I walk closer. And then closer. Still nothing. By now I am right in front of it. I grip my sword with my sweaty hands more tightly. I give it a sharp poke with my sword.
    “Open, fiend!” I shout but the words are muffled behind my helmet and I don’t think he understands. Just as I am about to shout louder, the dishwasher door lunges open and tries to swallow me. But I am quicker. Just. I jam my sword in it machinery, so it’s stuck, and can do nothing but gargle and froth angrily. I unpack it as fast as I can and the with a jerk, yank my sword out, and run out of the kitchen. I can hear it sloshing about darkly, probably planning it’s next dastardly deed on how to capture and eat me.
    For the next few hours I slave over my school work, trying to survive as Maths tries to twist my mind into a geometrical solid. I fight it. Then in English as I argue with Shakespeare sonnets and tussle with English adverbs. But finally, I am done.
    For the rest of the day I tour all the libraries in Christchurch prowling up and down the shelves like a starved animal, picking and choosing, keeping an eye out for glossy new covers and new publication dates. Once my hunger is satisfied (which takes a long time), I bring them all home and spend the afternoon in the garden, my body drinking up the afternoon sun and my mind drinking up the beauty of books.
    With a few snacks of course.

  2. 2

    Bailey said,

    Awesome, Ella!

  3. 3

    Tierney said,

    Um, that was actually me, just logged in as Bailey 🙂

  4. 5

    Tierney said,

    Here is my to-do list entry!

    – Put out rubbish
    OR
    – Create a machine to put out rubbish for me

    – Do the dishes
    OR
    – Hire a house fairy to clean the dishes

    – Take rubbish bins down the driveway
    OR
    – Strap them together into a chariot and ride rubbish bins down the driveway

    – Make my bed
    OR
    – Weave an invisibility cloak to throw over the messy bed

    – Read a library book
    OR
    – Read twenty library books

    -Tidy my room
    OR
    – Let the mess accumulate and create a jungle in my bedroom

    – Dust the bookshelves
    OR
    – Make sculptures out of dust and leave to grow

    – Walk down to check the mailbox
    OR
    – Learn to fly, and fly down!

    – Vacuum the carpet
    OR
    – Learn a Vanishing spell, and try to Vanish the dust!

    Of course, my ultimate to-do list would also involve going to plenty of Hogwarts classes, but I thought I’d end the list here!


Comment RSS

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: