Posts tagged writing tips

Writing Tip of the Week – Brian Falkner

This week’s writing tip comes from Brian Falkner, author of Tomorrow Code, Henry and the Flea, Brainjack, and his new book The Project.

“Writing is like learning to walk. You fall down, you get back up and try again. Little by little you learn from your mistakes. You get better and better at it, and one day it just happens and it is a magical moment.”

If you want to find out more about Brian Falkner’s books and writing, you can visit his cool website or read his Star Author posts here on the blog.

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Writing Tip of the Week – David Hill

This week’s writing tips comes from New Zealand author David Hill, author of See Ya Simon, Fat, Four-Eyed and Useless, and Running Hot.

“a. Read heaps. The more you read, the more ideas you get.
b. Don’t throw any of your writing away.
c. Start sending work away to places like The School Journal.”

You can read our full interview with David Hill on the Interviews with New Zealand Authors page.

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Writing Tip of the Week – Erin Hunter

This week’s writing tip comes from Erin Hunter, creator of the Warriors and Seekers series.

“Make sure you read a variety of stories: fantasy stories teach you about making up completely new worlds, crime-solving stories teach you about handling a complicated plot, stories with lots of characters teach you how to describe relationships.  Also, write as many stories as you can, even if no one else reads them.”

If you want to find out more about Erin Hunter and her books, check out her website.  One thing I learnt from her website is that ‘Erin Hunter’ is actually four different authors writing under the same pen name.

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Writing Tip of the Week – Jeff Kinney

This week’s writing tip comes from Jeff Kinney, author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series.

“I would recommend to any kid out there to keep a journal. Most of my friends can’t remember much about their childhood at all, and they wish they could. Even if you only keep a journal for a short while, I guarantee that you’ll treasure it for the rest of your life.”

Check out Jeff Kinney’s very funny website if you’d like to find out more about the author and his books.  You can also watch video’s, play games, and go behind-the-scenes of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid movie.

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Writing Tip of the Week – Steve Cole

This week’s writing tip comes from Steve Cole, author of Astrosaurs, Cows in Action, Slime Squad and Z-Rex.

“Grow a very thick skin and ask for criticism.  Listening to criticism can help you to write better.  Also, write as much as possible – the more you do, the better you get.”

You can read our interview with Steve Cole here on the blog.  Also, check out Steve’s website for more information about his books, videos and cool free downloads.

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Story Ideas

A lot of kids ask me where I get my story ideas.

Ideas for stories are all around you, all the time. What story writers do is to look around us and use our imagination.

All you have to do is to say “What if…”

What if my sister could fly…?
What if I found a million dollar note…?
What if my dog started talking to me…?
What if my best friend moved to Alaska…?
What if the sun went out…?

If you want an idea for a story, and you are really stuck, you could try my random story idea generator.

http://www.brianfalkner.co.nz/story_starters.asp

Just click on “Find an Idea” and keep clicking through the randomly generated ideas until you get one you like.

cheers

Brian

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Writing Tip of the Week – Derek Landy

This week’s writing tip comes from Derek Landy, creator of Skulduggery Pleasant, Valkyrie Cain, and many other unpleasant characters.  We asked Derek if he could give one piece of advice to budding writers what would it be?

“You have to have fun. When I wrote the first Skulduggery book I didn’t have a clue whether or not it would be published or if anybody would like it, so I concentrated on having fun.  I packed it full of things that I adore; fight scenes, jokes, horror, adventure, magic. Fun is contagious and if you have fun writing it, the reader will have fun reading it. “

Visit Derek Landy’s website for more information about the author and his books, and to test your knowledge of the Skulduggery books.

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Writing Tip of the Week – Margaret Mahy

Our writing tip this week is once again from Margaret Mahy, who will be at the Storylines Free Family Day next Sunday, 15 August at the Christchurch Town Hall.   Come along and listen to Margaret talk about her writing and read some of her books.

“I think writers ought to read a lot, and it is often good to be working on more one story. If your first story does not work out it is comforting to have another story to fall back on. Most writers have to work hard – to write and re-write their stories.”

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Writing Tip of the Week – Margaret Mahy

This week’s writing tip comes from one of New Zealand’s greatest writers, Margaret Mahy, who will be appearing at the Storylines Free Family Day in Christchurch on Sunday 15 August.  Margaret Mahy has written so many books that it’s impossible to name them all.  She writes picture books, like Down the Back of the Chair, as well as novels, like Kaitangata Twitch, Maddigan’s Fantasia, Memory, and Portable Ghosts.   We’ll be posting some other great writing tips from Margaret Mahy over the next couple of weeks in the lead-up to Storylines.  This week, she talks about the story ideas that come to her.

“My ideas mostly come from things that happen to me, but of course they are changed a great deal by the time the story is finished. The ideas begin with real things but I invent all sorts of things to add to them, or I change them in some way before the story is finished.”

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Writing Tip of the Week – Joseph Delaney

This week’s writing tip comes from Joseph Delaney, author of the spine-tingling Spook’s Apprentice and other books in the Wardstone Chronicles including his latest book, The Spook’s Nightmare.  Joseph tells us the inspirations for his books and where ideas come from.

The ideas for my books come from nightmares, dreams and day-dreams which I always jot down lest I forget them. Sometimes I’m inspired by the things that people say or do or a piece of town or countryside I see whilst out walking. I do more ‘writing’ in my head than I ever do on paper or type into my computer.

Check out Joseph Delaney’s creepy Spooks website to find out more about the author and his books.

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Writing Tip of the Week – Cressida Cowell

This week’s writing tip comes from Cressida Cowell, creator of Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III, star of How to Train Your Dragon, How to Cheat a Dragon’s Curse, and How to be a Pirate.  Cressida talks about how she comes up with all the funny names in the Hiccup books:

“I love playing games with words. I try to make the names sound like the person they are describing. ‘Snotlout’ is called Snotlout because he has a large nose, and ‘snotty’ can also mean ‘superior and thinking you’re a bit above everybody else’. A ‘lout’ is a brutish, brainless sort of person.
I make up the Dragonese in the same way. Therefore a ‘bird’ in Dragonese is a ‘song-munch’, because they sing and the dragons regard them as food.”

Go to Cressida Cowell’s website to find out more about the author and her writing.

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Writing Tip of the Week – Michael Morpurgo

This week’s writing tip comes from one of my favourite author’s, Michael Morpurgo, the author of Alone on a Wide, Wide Sea, The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips, Running Wild and Kaspar, Prince of Cats.  For something different, here is a video of Michael Morpurgo giving his own writing tips.

Visit Michael Morpurgo’s website for more information about him and his books.

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